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Baa Baa Black Sheep (later syndicated as Black Sheep Squadron) is a television series that aired on NBC from 1976 until 1978. Its premise was based on the experiences of United States Marine Corps aviator Pappy Boyington and his World War II "Black Sheep Squadron". The series was created and produced by Stephen J. Cannell. The opening credits read: "In World War II, Marine Corps Major Greg 'Pappy' Boyington commanded a squadron of fighter pilots. They were a collection of misfits and screwballs who became the terrors of the South Pacific. They were known as the Black Sheep." 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Season 1, Episode 24 - The Fastest Gun
    March 22, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 23 - Last One for Hutch
    March 8, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 22 - W*A*S*P*S
    March 1, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 21 - Poor Little Lambs
    February 22, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 20 - Trouble at Fort Apache
    February 15, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 19 - The Last Mission Over Sengai
    February 8, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 18 - Five the Hard Way
    February 1, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 17 - Devil in the Slot
    January 25, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 16 - The Deadliest Enemy of All (2)
    January 18, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 15 - The Deadliest Enemy of All (1)
    January 11, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 14 - The War Biz Warrior
    January 4, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 13 - Love and War
    December 14, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 12 - The Cat's Whiskers
    December 21, 1977
  • Season 1, Episode 11 - New Georgia On My Mind
    November 30, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 10 - Anyone for Suicide?
    November 23, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 9 - Up for Grabs
    November 16, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 8 - The Meatball Circus
    November 9, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 7 - Presumed Dead
    October 26, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 6 - Prisoners of War
    October 12, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 5 - High Jinx
    October 5, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 4 - Small War
    September 28, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 3 - Best Three Out of Five
    November 23, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 2 - Flying Misfits (2)
    September 21, 1976
  • Season 1, Episode 1 - Flying Misfits (1)
    September 21, 1976
  • Season 2, Episode 13 - A Little Bit of England
    April 6, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 12 - Sheep in the Limelight
    March 30, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 11 - The Show Must Go On... Sometimes
    March 22, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 10 - Hotshot
    March 15, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 9 - The Iceman
    March 8, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 8 - Fighting Angels
    March 1, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 7 - Forbidden Fruit
    February 22, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 6 - Ten'll Get You Five
    January 18, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 5 - Operation Stand-Down
    January 11, 1978
  • Season 2, Episode 4 - Wolves in the Sheep Pen
    January 4, 1977
  • Season 2, Episode 3 - The Hawk Flies on Sunday
    December 28, 1977
  • Season 2, Episode 2 - The 200 Pound Gorilla
    December 21, 1977
  • Season 2, Episode 1 - Divine Wind
    December 14, 1977

 

Vought F4U Corsair - from wikepedia.


What a beautiful piece of aircraft.

The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was a carrier-capable fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured by Vought, in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engine fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).

The Corsair served in the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marines, Fleet Air Arm and the Royal New Zealand Air Force, as well as the French Navy Aéronavale and other, smaller, air forces until the 1960s. It quickly became the most capable carrier-based fighter-bomber of World War II. Some Japanese pilots regarded it as the most formidable American fighter of World War II, and the U.S. Navy counted an 11:1 kill ratio with the F4U Corsair. As well as being an outstanding fighter, the Corsair proved to be an excellent fighter-bomber, serving almost exclusively in the latter role throughout the Korean War and during the French colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria.

The performance of the Corsair was impressive. The F4U-1 was considerably faster than the Grumman F6F Hellcat and only 13 mph (21 km/h) slower than the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt; all three were powered by the R-2800. But while the P-47 achieved its highest speed at 30,020 feet (9,150 m) with the help of an intercooled turbocharger, the F4U-1 reached its maximum speed at 19,900 ft (6,100 m), and used a mechanically supercharged engine.

Corsairs were flown by the famous "Black Sheep" Squadron (VMF-214, led by Marine Major Gregory "Pappy" Boyington) in an area of the Solomon Islands called "The Slot". Boyington was credited with 22 kills in F4Us (of 28 total, including six in an AVG P-40, although his score with the AVG has been disputed). Other noted Corsair pilots of the period included VMF-124's Kenneth Walsh, James E. Swett, and Archie Donohue, VMF-215's Robert M. Hanson and Don Aldrich, and VF-17's Tommy Blackburn, Roger Hedrick, and Ira Kepford. Nightfighter versions equipped Navy and Marine units afloat and ashore.

 

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